Oxytocin: The Forgotten Hormone

Oxytocin is a well studied hormone that is mainly thought to be involved in the female reproductive system.  However, recently there have been many studies conducted as to the other uses and functions Oxytocin may have on the human body in both males and females.  Below are some of the potential uses, function, and effects that Oxytocin has recently been shown to have on our bodies.

  • Increases orgasm in both male and females
  • Causes the nerves in the genital area to fire spontaneously leading to orgasm
  • Females need more Oxytocin to have an orgasm during their peak sexual arousal
  • Can make a mono-orgasmic woman into a multi-orgasmic woman
  • Can stimulate vaginal secretions to help make the tissues moist
  • Can be used as a probe for the lack of sex drive seen in 40% of American females
  • Improves milk production in lactating women
  • May decrease pain from ovarian cysts
  • May decrease nausea and vomiting of early pregnancy
  • Is released in response to a multitude of external stimuli
  • Plays a role in autism and may be an effective treatment for autism's repetitive and affiliative behaviors
  • Has been used as a treatment for Fibromyalgia by using Oxytocin and Nitroglycerin to increase levels of Nitric Oxide which is a natural pain killer that is found in the body
  • May help with the recovery process from an illness or procedure
  • A natural anti-depressant and anti-anxiety hormone
  • Increases circulation in peripheral blood vessels throughout the body
  • May increase testosterone production in males
  • May decrease production of DHA, which causes male pattern baldness
  • May improve vision
  • May decrease cortisol (stress) production
  • May increase a trust response towards others
  • May neutralize the effects of stress on the body
  • May make the body warmer
  • May help with drug withdrawal
  • Has been shown to promote pro-social behaviors such as emotional recognition and altruism
  • May reduce the endocrinal and psychological responses to social stress
  • May modulate (alter) social memory
  • May improve recognition memory of faces
  • The following may show low levels of Oxytocin:
    • Depression
    • Autism
    • AIDS
    • Multiple Sclerosis
    • Low Estrogen states
    • Low Thyroid T3
    • Chronic Stress
    • Chronic Opioid use
    • Prader-Willi Syndrome
    • Parkinson's
  • We are currently compounding Oxytocin in a rapid dissolve tablet, which is used sublingually.  The tablets come in packages of 12 for $25.00 with each containing 10 units of Oxytocin.  A prescription is required before these tablets can be given.  It is recommended to take a tablet 30-45 minutes prior to sexual intercourse.

 

References

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